Integrative Learning (ILS) Courses

ILS2003 The American Dream

This course will address the broad theme and question of “What is the American Dream” and also ask “Have we achieved it?” “Has it changed” and, “what is the cost of pursuing it?” We will explore this topic through various themes, including “Manifest Destiny”, “The Immigrant Experience”, “Civil Rights”, “Gender Rights”, “The Pursuit of Happiness”, “Work and Business”, and “Class and Culture.” While this course will primarily be a literature course, it will use a multidisciplinary approach to explore this topic from various perspectives, including history, economics, ethics, culture, psychology, and political science.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2010 Modern Identities: 20th Century Literature and Beyond

This integrative learning course explores the relationship between modern world literature and its historical, social and/or political contexts through the study of the 20th century literary works. Fiction, poetry, drama and/or the essay are used as vehicles for exploring major movements, trends and events of the 20th century. Themes of racial, ethnic and gender identity, political oppression and/or war are explored. Emphases vary.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2015 Honors Seminar: Postcolonial Literature

Colonization of Africa and Asia and ensuing post-colonial reconstruction, two world wars, the spread and fall of communism, human rights movements and immigration profoundly changed the face of the world. This discussion-and-writing-intensive Integrative Learning Honors Seminar focuses on literary responses to and representations of select movements and events of the 20th century (emphasis will vary). By reading texts through the lenses of postcolonial literary theory, history, philosophy, and ethics, students will examine the variety of human responses to the moral questions posed by colonialism, imperialism and the social and political movements that arose in their wake.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1024 or English placement, honors status, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2090 The Working Life

This course focuses on the important and complicated role of work for individuals and societies. One of the most common everyday questions is, "What do you do for a living?" That question, when thoroughly examined, reveals a great deal about how people view themselves and each other, and how much work shapes the human experience. Through the lenses of history, sociology and literature, students examine how working lives have changed over time, the experience of the worker in various contexts and how work shapes identity.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2110 The Atomic Age

This course provides an overview of how the emergence of nuclear science (and the catastrophic consequences of its military use on Japan to end the Second World War) marked the beginning of an Atomic Age. How is it that the world's greatest scientific thinkers could produce a technological innovation capable of destruction on a global scale? From August 1945 forward, no longer could one draw simple connections between "science" and "progress." And yet nuclear developments continued to shape every aspect of human existence: from international diplomacy and energy policy to the "nuclear family" and popular culture. Drawing on scientific discourse, world history, international relations theory, Cold War studies, policy analysis, energy and environmental studies, and gender and cultural studies, this course explores the multiple ways in which we continue to live in an Atomic Age.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2120 Capital Punishment in America

This course reviews the use and application of capital punishment in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Emphasizing the multidisciplinary approach, the rationales and justifications for state-sponsored executions and the efficacy of that reasoning in the modern world are assessed. The course examines the historical, social, ethical, judicial, legislative and political events that have led to the present patchwork approach to executions in the United States.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Denver, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2140 History of Science

This course explores human thought about the natural world from the earliest civilizations to the present. Students investigate a central question: From where did our ideas about the scientific process arise? At the heart of this course is the idea that science and technology are not isolated from the rest of society. Rather, they are shaped by historical and societal forces even as they influence civilization. In this course, students discuss the evolution of great scientific ideas of the past and the effects of religious, political, economic and social contexts on the development of scientific principles. Through close reading, analysis, discussion and integration of primary and secondary source materials, students make connections among the disciplines of history, theology, philosophy and science.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2150 Introduction to American Studies

This course introduces students to the major themes in American culture, both past and emerging. Students are given a sense of the tensions running through the identity and image of Americans here and around the world. As an integrative learning seminar, this course also serves as an introduction to the idea and practice of interdisciplinary scholarship. This course gives students a wide range of tools to make sense of what America is, has been and can be. Topics include traditional disciplines that help illuminate American culture. Focus is on art, music, literature, history and anthropology.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, Denver CE, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2180 Sexuality: Science/Culture/Law

Since 1950, there have been multiple revolutions in the way sexuality is conceptualized. In biology, evidence has mounted that sexual orientation is genetically and physiologically hardwired rather than a choice or preference. Literature and popular culture have moved from portraying homosexuality as a joke to treating it as a serious topic of personal liberation. The law has moved from criminalizing homosexual acts to granting same-sex marriage licenses. This course explores the links, or lack thereof, between these different developments. Is law more open to sexual variety because of the findings of brain science? Is popular culture more inclusive because of the increased economic clout of non-straights? Or did these things occur independently? How do we relate these developments to the post-structural analysis of sexuality that sexual identity is a modern invention?.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2213 The Earth in Peril: A Literary and Scientific Analysis

This course examines environmental issues created by unrealistic views about the earth’s capabilities. Relationships among people, environments and natural resources are analyzed through literature and scientific writings. Students examine why and how world views affect the natural world’s destruction and preservation.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2215 Honors Seminar: The Earth in Peril: A Literary and Scientific Analysis

This course examines environmental issues created by conflicting views about the earth's capabilities. Relationships among people, environments and natural resources are analyzed through literature and scientific writings. Students examine why and how world views affect the natural world's destruction and discuss possible theories of preservation. Students contribute to inquiry surrounding the issue of sustainability through research and analysis.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1024 or English placement, honors status, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2280 Science and Civilization

This course explores the social, political and historic contexts and implications of several scientific and technological developments through a variety of genres, including textbooks, newspapers and magazine articles, film, music, art, literature and the Internet. The goal of this course is to raise student awareness of the global impacts, positive and negative, associated with specific scientific and technological developments, with emphasis on discerning the interconnectedness of those impacts. Through inquiry, research and debate, students develop a better understanding of the unique historical, social, political and cultural contexts in which these scientific and technological developments evolved and the influence these contexts had upon the form of these developments. In addition, students gain a deeper appreciation of the implications of these developments on the present and future.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2325 Economics of Sin

This course integrates economic, sociological and psychological principles to examine price gouging, cheating, illegal drugs, sex and gambling. Emphasis is on examining these "sinful" behaviors in the context of moral development and theories of motivation. Students also examine how government seeks to change and penalize such behavior and the consequences of these interventions.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, Denver CE, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2370 Obesity

This course considers the now global problem of obesity from biological, psychological and sociological perspectives. Since the 1970s there has been a rapid increase in the incidence of overweight and obese individuals in the United States with 65% of adults now overweight. Childhood obesity rates have tripled in the last 20 years producing the first generation of Americans who are predicted to have a shorter life span than their parents. The obesity epidemic is widely acknowledged in the United States, but in the past two decades, this problem has also spread to developing countries as they accelerate their nutrition transition to more mass-produced and processed foods. The roles of government and business will be explored, in influencing access to foods and in defining obesity vs. health. The study of this now global problem is relevant from a personal health perspective as well as a political and economic perspective. Individuals empowered with knowledge can modify their own food environments and that of their children. A well-educated populace may wish to support initiatives to make progress on this societal problem to avoid economic losses in productivity and healthcare costs that will compromise America’s competitiveness.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2385 Visual Literacy and the Sociology of Perception

This course studies human perception of the social world from both a communications and sociological perspective. Elements of picture-based media as a means of molding cultural perceptions, social biases and personal views of reality are studied. Through a series of exercises, students critically examine images in art, still photographs, television, advertising, film and documentaries to determine their sociological messages. Using the language of visual literacy and an understanding of perception, students test assumptions about their world.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2390 The XX Factor

The XX Factor takes an integrative learning approach to gender role development that foregrounds psychology and literature. This approach provides multiple lenses through which to examine current and historical concepts of women’s psychological and social development. It prioritizes close textual analysis of gender identity and sexuality as figured in literature across a broad spectrum. The course considers both conformity and resistance to societal biases, stereotyping, and the imposition of gender and sexual norms. In doing so, it promotes critical thinking about the diverse possibilities for women’s identities.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2435 Leonardo da Vinci: Culture, Art and Math

This course covers a portion of the movement in Europe known as the Renaissance. The works of Leonardo da Vinci are explored. Students discover how da Vinci's insatiable hunger for understanding impacted the culture of Florence and Milan, Italy, as well as the entire world. Students learn about da Vinci himself and his place in society. Some of da Vinci's works of art, writings on architectural design and war machines are examined culturally, historically and mathematically.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, MATH1002 or MATH1020 or math placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2440 Logic, Reasoning and Nonsense: How to Tell the Difference

This course introduces students to logic, a discipline that straddles public policy, philosophy, law and mathematics. Students are empowered to use logic in their personal and professional lives to make informed decisions, identify invalid arguments and debate current topics. Topics include formal structures of thought as they can be readily applied to the organization of thought in written and spoken language. Students identify the logical errors or fallacies that are most frequently made in written and oral discourse.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, MATH1002 or math placement, sophomore status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4020 Keywords in Social Media

This course asks students to identify and analyze the roots of several keywords from historical, sociological and technological perspectives; to demonstrate knowledge of how to do things with keywords (i.e., how sharing information can lead to apprehending a criminal); and to evaluate the relevance of keywords to life in a democratic society. Abstract theories are applied to concrete case studies of social networks.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, North Miami, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4070 Nostalgia, Memory and Hybrid Identity

As individuals, we need not be immigrants to understand, and even identify with, the search for home and belonging. As global citizens, most of whose families have at some point been immigrants, whether by choice or displacement, we recognize the powerful and complicated impact of migration on all aspects of identity. Nostalgia, Memory and Hybrid Identity examines diasporic literature in the context of cultural theory, history, psychology, philosophy and popular culture (such as music, film and art) to better understand these cultural negotiations. Students explore the ways diasporic literature of the last century has significantly transformed the literary, theoretical and cultural landscape of the U.S, and has raised a range of complex issues relating to identity, language, border crossings (geographical, linguistic and gender, etc.) hybridity, and acculturation and resistance. Readings will range across such genres as memoir, fiction, essay, drama, and poetry to consider how issues of identity and tradition are represented and contested by immigrant writers in the context of displacement and diaspora.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4113 Coming on Strong: A Cultural Approach to Diet, Health and Fitness

This course takes a chronological approach to the topics of diet, health and fitness, and examines how scientific, religious, philosophical and cultural ideas regarding health and fitness have changed over time. Students investigate how changing ideas regarding gender and ethnicity, economic and technological changes, scientific discoveries, political ideology, and religious and philosophical beliefs have influenced and been influenced by concerns with health and well-being.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Denver, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4115 Contemporary Approaches to Classical and World Mythology

This course introduces students to classical and world mythology in order to understand the eternal, timeless nature of universal archetypes and themes while also exploring how they acquire new, contemporary meanings. Students learn to interpret myth using elements of literature as well as through the theories of myth interpretation. From Homer to Harry Potter, emphasis is placed upon analysis of primary readings as well as their interpretations within the context of a variety of disciplines. Class discussions and student writing encourage critical thinking, synthesis and application of the terminology of the study of mythology.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4120 Disease and Culture

This course addresses the question of what constitutes a disease from the perspectives of science and the humanities. Topics include the origins of disease and the effect that disease has had on political events, art and culture, warfare, and the economy of societies both historically and in today's world, and how societies throughout time have attempted, either successfully or unsuccessfully, to address the problem of disease. Students explore the cultural interpretations given to various diseases. Through the examination and analysis of various medical case studies, historical readings and literary pieces, students learn to think critically about how disease has helped to shape the world that we live in and what disease means to them.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Denver, Online, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4130 History of Digital Art

This course surveys the emerging world of digitally originated and exhibited artwork. A wide range of digital art formats are examined, including (but not limited) to 2-D, 3-D, motion, interactive, immersive, sensor-based, internet-based and "gamification." Key art historical influences in the technology of art creation from the Renaissance to the 21st century are explored. Major art periods such as Fluxus, Conceptual, Dada and Post-Modernism are reviewed as they relate to the development and growth of the late 20th century digital art movement. Students investigate the history and growth of international public art paradigms and practices and their connections to digital art through civic, public and private institutions. Students also examine the relationship between digital art and the industry of creative design and media. Through active visual research of curated digital art pieces students discover a wide array of critically noted digital artists and their work. Finally, students consider the new aesthetics of digital art, comparing and contrasting them to more conventional art formats and exhibition models.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4140 The Legal Imagination

This course introduces students to the textual nature of the law. Through intensive study of literary, persuasive and legal texts, students explore the commonalities between what we call "literature" and what we call "law". Students begin to see the "constitutive rhetoric" of those texts, through which an author creates a social and political community with words.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, one LAW-designated course, one LIT-designated course or MCST2030, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4170 Passion, Power and Principle: Lessons at Play in Shakespeare

This course employs the still-relevant insights of the Shakespearean canon as a means of understanding and resolving contemporary ethical dilemmas, social tensions and the conflicting demands of citizenship in today's world. Focus is on the resolution of moral dilemmas involving divisions of power, the use of authority, familial obligations and conflicting loyalties. This course takes an integrative learning approach that draws on literature, philosophy (ethics) and history to promote analysis and meaningful comparisons between the problems confronted in the world of Shakespeare's plays (and the society they reflect) and those faced by us today.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4176 Sports in Film and Literature

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the significant inspiration of athletic endeavors upon the literary and cinematic imagination. Writers of fiction and nonfiction, prose writers and poets have discovered in the athletic experience a useful metaphor to express the purpose and meaning of life. Modern film explores both the realism and romanticism of sports in popular culture. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the essence of games as myth and metaphor and develop an appreciation of the historical context in which the stories are constructed and heard. The interdisciplinary considerations of history and culture allow for a richer understanding and appreciation of sports and sports literature.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4178 Studies in Nostalgia, or the Way Things Never Were

This course allows students to explore the tendency to look back with fondness on some distant, wonderful past. Is nostalgia a basic human condition? Students explore this question across cultures and through the lenses offered by biology, psychology, literature, history and other academic disciplines. Nostalgia as a type of fiction writing is discussed, along with the consequences of those "stories". The work of nostalgia as it engages discourses of political ideology, race, gender, sexuality, class, etc. is discussed. Students study a few particular examples of American nostalgia before turning their attention to the work nostalgia is doing now and the consequences of that work.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4180 Things That Go Bump In the Night: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Supernatural

This course explores the deeper meanings of supernatural creatures in works of film and literature from the perspectives of history, science, philosophy, literature and film. The course addresses the question of why certain supernatural creatures (e.g., vampires, zombies, werewolves, ghosts, the demonically possessed, Frankenstein's monster and extraterrestrial creatures) have featured so prominently in human thought, human fears and works of literature and film from antiquity to the present day. In doing so, the course addresses the historical context in which such beliefs have arisen and how they have changed. Students are encouraged to apply interpretive skills to an analysis of supernatural creatures with which they are familiar and to draw connections between the monsters of the 21st century and societal changes and hidden conflicts in the contemporary world.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4210 Colors

This course explores the role and importance of colors in the natural world, astronomy, geology, human society, culture, psychology, art and many other disciplines. Topics include the physics of color and its perception by animals and the color of the ocean, rocks, minerals, stars and galaxies. In addition, the various uses of color by plants is examined, including the utilization of colored pigments by plants for light absorption in photosynthesis. The various ways that animals use color are also explored, including how colors are used by both predators and prey and how they are used to attract mates. Additional topics include the affect of colors on humans, including mood, language, musical expression, and as a symbol of national or group identity in politics and religion. Colors have a profound influence in artistic expression and in the food and fashion industries. The importance of colors in all of these different disciplines are examined. With the knowledge and skills learned in this course, students are able to explore the use and application of colors in their own chosen field of interest.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any BIO, CHM, PHY or SCI-designated course, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4270 Narragansett Bay

This course, both in-class and outdoors, investigates the natural history, industrial development, ecological changes and cultural transformations that occurred from pre-Colonial to post-industrial periods in the Narragansett Bay watershed. The course searches policy solutions to guide future development and examines the geological, biological, economic and cultural history of Narragansett Bay. Students explore the arrival and settlement of humans and the effect of human populations in the Narragansett Bay region. The relationship between climate change and the Narragansett Bay region is analyzed. A place-based, active-learning pedagogy is used to bridge institutional divides existing between academic disciplines. The integration of several theoretical methodologies facilitates effective examination into the ecological changes of the bay, the historical impact of urbanization, industrial land use, and residential development on environmental quality. Allegorical stories of places in the watershed are combined with a "sense of place" analysis to understand how local culture addresses real problems of the Bay. Students research environmental and economic viability through various pollution studies and integrated assessments using science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics skills.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4302 Abuse of Power: Corruption in Contemporary Society

This course examines how (in the hands of certain individuals and groups and under "favorable" social, political, historical and economic conditions) the abuse of power and corruption impacts lives in all social strata. Students analyze this question and propose research-based recommendations for transforming dysfunctional systems into sustainable and productive models.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4320 (De)Constructing Race and Color

This course addresses the racialization processes involved in the social construction of the color of race — White, Yellow, Brown, Red and Black — through interdisciplinary studies including the arts, humanities, social sciences, biology, law and education. The course identifies the key parameters of the racialization process (historical subjugation through involuntary immigration and migration, voluntary immigration, prejudice, stereotypes, scientific racism, cultural racism, and systemic) of institutional racism and how various groups in the United States were raced into a color. Students are tasked with thinking about why race matters within educational, economic, political and social institutions. The course involves intentional discourse on the complexity of the color of race through scientific interrogation, analysis and interpretation of the course materials to understand the social construction of the color of race and how race can be deconstructed in the 21st century.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4340 Global Food Security and Leading Change Locally

This interdisciplinary course critically assesses the global challenges of food security and how leadership in a local community organization addresses food access. Food is explored from a cultural, nutritional, ecological and ethical context while analyzing issues of food production, causes of insufficient supply, nutritional and health implications, and effects on quality of life. Evaluation of political, environmental, technological and economic factors that contribute to the perpetual issue of food insecurity and the social consequences also occurs. The critical issue of the course examines whether access to food is a basic human right and whose responsibility it is to provide societal members with the nourishment needed to be productive. These perspectives are explored theoretically, on the global scale, and experientially, in the local community. Additionally the student utilizes his/her leadership skills to engage 40 hours of community service in an organization of his/her choosing, preferably nonprofit or with professor approval a for-profit socially responsible organization. The student completes a substantial agency-based project, in conjunction with his/her site supervisor that serves as a tangible contribution to the overall organization and its ability to address food security locally.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4430 Explorations in Symmetry

The course introduces the student to the basic concept of symmetry and its important role as a unifying agent in the understanding of mathematics, nature, art, architecture and music. Topics covered include an introduction to group theory, the mathematical language of symmetry, transformations, general symmetry principles and applications.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, MATH1002 or math placement, senior status.
Offered at Charlotte, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours