Integrative Learning (ILS) Courses

ILS2010 Modern Identities: 20th Century Literature and Beyond

This integrative learning course explores the relationship between modern world literature and its historical, social and/or political contexts through the study of the 20th century literary works. Fiction, poetry, drama and/or the essay are used as vehicles for exploring major movements, trends and events of the 20th century. Themes of racial, ethnic and gender identity, political oppression and/or war are explored. Emphases vary.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2090 The Working Life

This course focuses on the important and complicated role of work for individuals and societies. One of the most common everyday questions is, "What do you do for a living?" That question, when thoroughly examined, reveals a great deal about how people view themselves and each other, and how much work shapes the human experience. Through the lenses of history, sociology and literature, students examine how working lives have changed over time, the experience of the worker in various contexts and how work shapes identity.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2110 The Atomic Age

This course provides an overview of how the emergence of nuclear science (and the catastrophic consequences of its military use on Japan to end the Second World War) marked the beginning of an Atomic Age. How is it that the world's greatest scientific thinkers could produce a technological innovation capable of destruction on a global scale? From August 1945 forward, no longer could one draw simple connections between "science" and "progress." And yet nuclear developments continued to shape every aspect of human existence: from international diplomacy and energy policy to the "nuclear family" and popular culture. Drawing on scientific discourse, world history, international relations theory, Cold War studies, policy analysis, energy and environmental studies, and gender and cultural studies, this course explores the multiple ways in which we continue to live in an Atomic Age.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2120 Capital Punishment in America

This course reviews the use and application of capital punishment in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Emphasizing the multidisciplinary approach, the rationales and justifications for state-sponsored executions and the efficacy of that reasoning in the modern world are assessed. The course examines the historical, social, ethical, judicial, legislative and political events that have led to the present patchwork approach to executions in the United States.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2140 History of Science

This course explores human thought about the natural world from the earliest civilizations to the present. Students investigate a central question: From where did our ideas about the scientific process arise? At the heart of this course is the idea that science and technology are not isolated from the rest of society. Rather, they are shaped by historical and societal forces even as they influence civilization. In this course, students discuss the evolution of great scientific ideas of the past and the effects of religious, political, economic and social contexts on the development of scientific principles. Through close reading, analysis, discussion and integration of primary and secondary source materials, students make connections among the disciplines of history, theology, philosophy and science.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2280 Science and Civilization

This course explores the social, political and historic contexts and implications of several scientific and technological developments through a variety of genres, including textbooks, newspapers and magazine articles, film, music, art, literature and the Internet. The goal of this course is to raise student awareness of the global impacts, positive and negative, associated with specific scientific and technological developments, with emphasis on discerning the interconnectedness of those impacts. Through inquiry, research and debate, students develop a better understanding of the unique historical, social, political and cultural contexts in which these scientific and technological developments evolved and the influence these contexts had upon the form of these developments. In addition, students gain a deeper appreciation of the implications of these developments on the present and future.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2325 Economics of Sin

This course integrates economic, sociological and psychological principles to examine price gouging, cheating, illegal drugs, sex and gambling. Emphasis is on examining these "sinful" behaviors in the context of moral development and theories of motivation. Students also examine how government seeks to change and penalize such behavior and the consequences of these interventions.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, Denver CE, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2370 Obesity

This course considers the now global problem of obesity from biological, psychological and sociological perspectives. Since the 1970s there has been a rapid increase in the incidence of overweight and obese individuals in the United States with 65% of adults now overweight. Childhood obesity rates have tripled in the last 20 years producing the first generation of Americans who are predicted to have a shorter life span than their parents. The obesity epidemic is widely acknowledged in the United States, but in the past two decades, this problem has also spread to developing countries as they accelerate their nutrition transition to more mass-produced and processed foods. The roles of government and business will be explored, in influencing access to foods and in defining obesity vs. health. The study of this now global problem is relevant from a personal health perspective as well as a political and economic perspective. Individuals empowered with knowledge can modify their own food environments and that of their children. A well-educated populace may wish to support initiatives to make progress on this societal problem to avoid economic losses in productivity and healthcare costs that will compromise America’s competitiveness.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2385 Visual Literacy and the Sociology of Perception

This course studies human perception of the social world from both a communications and sociological perspective. Elements of picture-based media as a means of molding cultural perceptions, social biases and personal views of reality are studied. Through a series of exercises, students critically examine images in art, still photographs, television, advertising, film and documentaries to determine their sociological messages. Using the language of visual literacy and an understanding of perception, students test assumptions about their world.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS2435 Leonardo da Vinci: Culture, Art and Math

This course covers a portion of the movement in Europe known as the Renaissance. It explores the works of one particular man, Leonardo da Vinci, and how his insatiable hunger for understanding impacted the culture of Florence and Milan, Italy. The course begins by examining da Vinci himself and his place in society, then moves on to examine some of his works of art and writings on architectural design and war machines culturally, historically and mathematically.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1020 or ENG1024 or English placement, MATH1002 (or higher), sophomore status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4115 Contemporary Approaches to Classical and World Mythology

This course introduces students to classical and world mythology in order to understand the eternal, timeless nature of universal archetypes and themes while also exploring how they acquire new, contemporary meanings. Students learn to interpret myth using elements of literature as well as through the theories of myth interpretation. From Homer to Harry Potter, emphasis is placed upon analysis of primary readings as well as their interpretations within the context of a variety of disciplines. Class discussions and student writing encourage critical thinking, synthesis and application of the terminology of the study of mythology.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any ILS 2000-level course, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4120 Disease and Culture

This course addresses the question of what constitutes a disease from the perspectives of science and the humanities. Topics include the origins of disease and the effect that disease has had on political events, art and culture, warfare, and the economy of societies both historically and in today's world, and how societies throughout time have attempted, either successfully or unsuccessfully, to address the problem of disease. Students explore the cultural interpretations given to various diseases. Through the examination and analysis of various medical case studies, historical readings and literary pieces, students learn to think critically about how disease has helped to shape the world that we live in and what disease means to them.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any ILS 2000-level course, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Denver, Online, Providence
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4130 History of Digital Art

This course surveys the emerging world of digitally originated and exhibited artwork. A wide range of digital art formats are examined, including (but not limited) to 2-D, 3-D, motion, interactive, immersive, sensor-based, internet-based and "gamification." Key art historical influences in the technology of art creation from the Renaissance to the 21st century are explored. Major art periods such as Fluxus, Conceptual, Dada and Post-Modernism are reviewed as they relate to the development and growth of the late 20th-century digital art movement. Students investigate the history and growth of international public art paradigms and practices and their connections to digital art through civic, public and private institutions. Students also examine the relationship between digital art and the industry of creative design and media. Through active visual research of curated digital art pieces students discover a wide array of critically noted digital artists and their work. Finally, students consider the new aesthetics of digital art, comparing and contrasting them to more conventional art formats and exhibition models.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any ILS 2000-level course, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4176 Sports in Film and Literature

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the significant inspiration of athletic endeavors upon the literary and cinematic imagination. Writers of fiction and nonfiction, prose writers and poets have discovered in the athletic experience a useful metaphor to express the purpose and meaning of life. Modern film explores both the realism and romanticism of sports in popular culture. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the essence of games as myth and metaphor and develop an appreciation of the historical context in which the stories are constructed and heard. The interdisciplinary considerations of history and culture allow for a richer understanding and appreciation of sports and sports literature.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any ILS 2000-level course, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4180 Things That Go Bump In the Night: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Supernatural

This course explores the deeper meanings of supernatural creatures in works of film and literature from the perspectives of history, science, philosophy, literature and film. The course addresses the question of why certain supernatural creatures (e.g., vampires, zombies, werewolves, ghosts, the demonically possessed, Frankenstein's monster and extraterrestrial creatures) have featured so prominently in human thought, human fears and works of literature and film from antiquity to the present day. In doing so, the course addresses the historical context in which such beliefs have arisen and how they have changed. Students are encouraged to apply interpretive skills to an analysis of supernatural creatures with which they are familiar and to draw connections between the monsters of the 21st century and societal changes and hidden conflicts in the contemporary world.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any ILS2000-level course, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4190 The Problem With Evil

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the examination of evil as a concept that has fascinated and horrified humans throughout history. Through religions, social norms, philosophies and literatures, people have attempted to define evil in order to explain, and make meaningful, aspects of life that seem otherwise incomprehensible or unbearably senseless. The course explores the construction and uses of evil as a defining term, and its impact on nations, communities and individuals. Students read a wide range of texts across broad historical and cultural spectrums, looking for the answers to this question that continues to perplex and captivate us.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any ILS 2000-level course, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours

ILS4302 Abuse of Power: Corruption in Contemporary Society

This course examines how (in the hands of certain individuals and groups and under "favorable" social, political, historical and economic conditions) the abuse of power and corruption impacts lives in all social strata. Students analyze this question and propose research-based recommendations for transforming dysfunctional systems into sustainable and productive models.
Prerequisite(s): ENG1021 or ENG1027, any ILS2000-level course, senior status. (OL)
Offered at Charlotte, Denver, North Miami, Online, Providence, Providence CE
4.5 Quarter Credit Hours